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Save the Tweet

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 2 months ago

Tweet is a verb!

I am dismayed, disappointed and disheartened that the term for Twitter posts/entries is steadily transforming from "tweets" to "twitters." Although the stodgy old New York Times got it right, calling posts to Twitter tweets, even the Twitter staff is now referring to tweets as Twitters (with a capital T, for God's sake!). The only logical explanation is that this attempt to kill tweet in favor of Twitter must be the work of some diabolical brand manager trying to "effectively position the company namesake into the vernacular of its users" or some stupid crap like that.

Help me educate the masses. Here are the facts:

  • Tweet (v): The act of making a post/entry to the Twitter website/service (as in: Excuse me, I need to step outside to tweet). One can turn tweet into a gerund (as in: Don't bother me! I'm tweeting!)
  • Tweet (n): A post/entry to the Twitter website/service (as in: It's been 9 minutes since my last tweet).
  • Twitter (n): The website/service (as in: I've got five tabs open, and four of them are on Twitter). Using Twitter as a verb is unacceptable simply an alternative.

SPREAD THE WORD: TWEET IS A VERB (and a noun, too)!

Sign here to join my crusade!!

Stop the madness! Help protect tweet as the word used to describe a post/entry to the Twitter service, and as the verb describing the act of posting to Twitter. Spread the word! Post a link to this page on your blog, website or whatever, and tweet the link, too. Add your name and URL below to show your support for tweet.


 

ANTI-TWEET

 

The English language is a living and changing thing, but the word TWITTER is, in fact, a verb. Since it is being used to name this new form of communication, that verb has been transformed into a noun.

 

Examples:

That was a steep climb, but we got to the top.

I enjoy a good read before bed.

Before you take that coffee away, I'll have another pour.

 

 

Take note that a word typically used as a noun can be changed into a verb by context.

 

Examples:

I propose we table that until the next meeting.

Please fax that document to me.

Should you bottle that, you'd make a fortune.

 

Your assertion that TWEET is a derivation of TWITTER is incorrect. Language grows and develops through social interaction, not by mandate.

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